Diverse Culture & Simple Thrills: The 2010 Inaugural Aruba International Film Festival – Feature

Crystal clear waters begin to glisten and pulsate against the towering buildings along the crescent coastline. The Atlantic is welcoming to guests and residents of nearly forty cultures. It is a diverse and beautiful island so it is of no surprise that Aruba is hosting its first ever International Film Festival.

When Aruba decided to peruse the notion of a festival, they decided on recruiting Claudio Mazzenga, a charismatic man whom has helped oversee such esteemed festivals as the Venice and Rome Film Festivals. To make a successful festival, the industry veteran knew that the journey would include choosing the right films and most importantly bringing Hollywood with the local community, which similarly minded celebrities, like his long time friend Richard Gere.

During a local open discussion entitled “In Conversation With..” which highlights an artist’s body of work and interaction with the festival, Gere appeared very humble taking in the amount of appreciation the mainly Dutch population had for him. Gere addressed questions about his humanitarian efforts and the daunting challenge of being a first time producer for “Hachiko: A Dog’s Tale”, the Opening Night film. His attendance helped propel the festival in the right direction. Afterwards drinks were poured and bare feet danced as the eagerly awaited film festival showed a strong start.

After experiencing the rich nightlife, the island’s tropical lushness always helps weary travelers rejuvenate for their next experience. The Hyatt Regency Aruba rests on a exclusive part of the island, right where the beach begins to crescent westward. This curve makes the waters calm and generally untouched by weather. The Atlantic Ocean’s color pulsates with blue and greens, and the finely grained sand is a welcome feeling to the skin.

Not to be unmatched, the Hyatt’s elaborate pool area boasted enough amenities such as bar cabanas, poolside dining, a twisting waterside, and sunbathed mermaids that this traveler could hardly decide where to spend many mornings. Lost between the pleasures of each, the sun begins to settle as the festival comes into full swing.

Crowds of Arubans turned up for the nightly red carpet events located at the Paseo Herencia Cinema positioned across from the resorts. Local news and radio personalities hosted the event and constantly switched between English and Spanish. Applause filled the area as festival goers welcomed the cast of “Venezzia,” a love story centered during the country’s involvement in World War II. The island of Aruba related to the story, since the oil used during the war by the Venezuelans were drilled off the coast only a few miles away. The cast included Latin TV star Ruddy Rodriguez, who shared in the belief that a festival in Aruba can help bridge the gap between Hollywood and Latin America. His hope is that the commanding beauty and adventure here will bring visitors, and hopefully will expose them to diverse cultures of the surrounding countries; including Venezuela.

The positive vibe of the locals and incumbent travelers echoed during the film’s screening and continued next door to Mr. Jazz, where moviegoers were treated to luscious mojitos and salsa dancing. The encompassing themed night showed just a taste of how, with each day, the festival would embrace a different aspect of the island; whether it be Island Chic or American influence.

Five miles south of the premiere resort area rests a secluded cove that offers hands-on experience with aquatic life for novice mariners. De Palm Island offers snorkeling through vibrant reefs, thrilling banana boat rides, and a very unique attraction; the Sea Trek underwater walk. New to many weary outsiders the walk utilizes snuba: a variation of scuba diving where a helmet piped to the surface allows one to walk on the ocean floor 25 feet below. Underneath the diver feels a sense of slow-motion weightless as snapper and rainbow fish approach unafraid. The experience takes some getting used to, but with trained divers escorting guests through the maze and simultaneously photographing the whole event in front of real wreckage, this excursion would be a highlight for any thrill enthusiast.

Before returning to the film festival. patrons congregated in the beautiful open air hotel lobby of the Hyatt to embark on a De Palm off-road safari. The first thought inclined that this would be a gentle excursion along the beaches mainly because anyone was allowed to drive. Waivers were signed, and the visitors boarded five yellow and black-striped Land Rovers. What was to followed threw all previous expectations out the window.

After a quick drive over the asphalt jungle of the upscale resort area, the rovers embarked into the rocky desolate desert terrain located on the northern part of the island. The strong easterly winds prevent architects from building alongside the picturesque oceanside vistas, which include natural bridges, veering rock formations, and towering cacti.

The 4 1/2 hour  drive included more turns and bumps that rivaled any American theme park ride, and with the added flavor of the local tour guide that pitched us information with humorous undertones, the eventual consensus among the riders was that this safari was a not-to-miss attraction. The final uphill trek atop a lone mountain peppered with lizards and local goats ended with a much deserved dip in Aruba’s captivating natural pool. Looking at the diversity of Aruba’s terrain one could imagine how it would influence local and international filmmakers to shoot there.

That evening, the festival event is shrouded in black ties and flowing dresses. An orange glow pulsates throughout Paseo Herencia as writer/director Guillermo Arriaga takes the stage. The Oscar lauded writer of “21 Grams” and “Babel” attended to host a screening of “The Burning Plain,” his directorial debut starring Charlize Theron. The film revolves around the themes of regret, escape and infidelity using a non-linear structure that links all three storylines together. As a Mexican writer, Arriaga is no stranger to the clashing of American influence on foreign culture. He seemed very pleased by the the large turnout for a culture as diverse as Aruba.

The final night, marking the end of the first half of the festival, encompasses belly dancers, fine champagne and a rich view of the pristine star filled sky that only an island paradise can offer. An inaugural festival is always a tricky feat to attempt but the eagerness and the sheer exhilaration of all who attended the 1st Annual Aruba International Film Festival show its definitive potential to make it work in the long run.

By Paul Wassberg

Exacting The Story: The PBS Winter 2010 TCA Press Tour – Feature

PBS always understands the importance of relevant arts and science programming although sometimes its approach appeals more to a bygone generation settled in their ideas with a continual approach to knowledge but not a new approach to thinking in terms of process solving. The reflected programs take on a structure of life gained but still being maintained which in a good way provides a sense of both contentment and warmth in a constantly scitzophrenic state.

American Masters: When You’re Strange This documentary on The Doors which optimizes never-before-seen footage made its premiere at the Sundance Film Festival in 2009 and has gone a tightening including a new narration by actor Johnny Depp to replace the temp track by director Tom DiCillo.

John Densmore, the drummer for The Doors, had always been a major proponent force in maintaining their culture relevance whereas other surviving members Ray Manzarek and Robbie Krieger seemed to want the music to speak for themselves. Despite a very public discernation of the use of the name “The Doors” in terms of touring a couple years back, this new ideal between them seems to translate into the want to create a museum piece to accurately represent the band. John says that he is honored that they have been included in the American Masters series making the joke that “now I know why I wear a cape”. He speaks of the process of The Doors from his perspective. He and Robbie had been living together and Jim [Morrison] came to the top of the hill and was depressed. He sat outside looking above the LA skyline and wrote the lyrics (People are strange/when you’re a stranger/Faces look ugly/when you’re alone) before he came back inside which in turn reflects the ideal behind the title. Densmore says that much of the footage in the docu he has seen before but with this incarnation “there is more depth to the story for me”. He speaks that when they played the Hollywood Bowl, Harrison Ford was a grip on the crew. In terms of the actual idea of the band, he likes the confusion. Some of the new footage brought in which he talks about is “The Highway” footage which was shot when they first got big. In “Strange”, Jim is driving in this footage and the radio comes on to say that Jim Morrison had just died which was trippy. He admits that doesn’t remember all the gigs that they played and honestly didn’t “realize what a dangerous force we were”. That came to a culimination he said at the New Haven concert: “Jim was backstage with some fan and the cops maced him”. The band headed onstage and start playing “Back Door Man”. Jim stopped the song and started talking about “the little blue man in the little blue cap”. That was the end of the show. Manzarek got on the mike and told everyone to go to the police station. While Densmore admits Morrison “couldn’t play one chord on any instrument”, “he was a genius with words” and “he had the melodies” and “could do them arpeggio”.

Densmore talks about the long sections of instrumental they would have in pieces like “The End”. He explains it as “very jazzy” but that “creativity sometimes comes in the same package”. In terms of the legacy of Morrison, Densmore says that he looks to him now and sees that “his destiny was to have this quick shooting star” adding that “he was channelling the angst, the music and the magic”. In reference to the Oliver Stone film in the 1990s which was based on his book, he said “Val Kilmer should have been nominated” because his performance “gave me the creeps on set”. He does admit that the Stone movie was “excessive” but as “Oliver says, ‘If you don’t like my film on your chest, don’t go see my movie'”. Densmore makes reference to the aspect of doing commercials because “Jim blew up” and that because of this “The Doors have never done a car commerical”. In terms of influence, he says “you can hear a little of us in U2” though “we didn’t have a bass player”. He admits that they did two albums after Jim died but they eventually realized: “What are we doing?” saying “we didn’t want to replace those leather pants”. Densmore says that Ray and Robbie tried to sing but it “didn’t give us the synchronicity”. The one aspect that he sees in “People Are Strange” which is not in Stone’s movie is “a humor and lightness”. Jim Morrison, he says, “was a blast in the beginning before his self-destruction” because “he became an alcoholic really”. The Doors’ time together he describes more now “as some kind of beautiful dream I had” but with “Strange” now he looks and “it is right there on the screen again”.

Dick Wolf, the TV magnate who was instrumental in getting this new film made, speaks to the addition of Johnny Depp’s voice over after the film was picked up at Sundance in saying “Johnny made one astounding change by personalizing it and using the [band members’] first names”. Wolf continues that “it gave a magnificent shift to evidence for the film” which is “something you can’t buy”.

Independent Lens: Dirt The Movie This film which also came out of Sundance in 2009 talks about the essence of what this specific resource does for the planet.

Jamie Lee Curtis, who was brought in to narrate the doc after its pick up, explains that Bill Benenson [who directed the film] is a neighbor of hers. She admits they “both live surrounded by dirt” but that they “also ended up at the same school as parents”. Her actions in the film are “not on camera” but she “acts as the voice of reason if you will”. It is good now she says that everybody understands the importance of green. She and her husband Christopher Guest were selected to be the EV1 family in terms of getting the new hybrid but admits “they came and stole it back”. Now they got a Honda Clarity but explains that “we’re all trying to do something”. For her, it is about “educating”. She hopes that “one of our kids will fix [the mess we made]” confessing that “we fucked up”.

Gene Rosow, the co-director of the production with Benenson, says that every facet has an effect. He uses the example that a chef he knows in NY mentioned a difference in the tenderness of pork based on certain properties of the dirt it consumes. He speaks to the analogy present in “how we treat dirt is how we treat ourselves”. He does think that awareness is growing but that the generation of kids right now will have to be the ones to see it through. The paradox for him through is that he sees the US as being a divided country. A certain energy emerges because everyone has their own separate tribe though people are starting to understand the fundamental urgency behind the economic and environmental obstacles society is starting to face. Rosow’s belief is that there is starting to be “an awakening to a real crisis” but that there is “a lack of literacy on this issue” that will soon cause people to “wake up”.

Executive Briefing: Sarah Eaton The former Fine Line Features topper displays her key element of processing the different elements necessary to maintain public television on a national scale yet the key still is balancing an aspect of the baby boomer mentality but still bringing in some new viewers.

“Masterpiece” has always attracted a stable of names to its roster. Eaton announced that they are now working on a new production of “Emma” which will be created as a four-hour miniseries for the “Classic” brand while Kenneth Branagh will be working on “Mr. Mollander” for the “Mystery” brand which will also be undertaking three new “Foyle’s Wars”.

Masterpiece Classic: Anne Frank The new intentions of a classic literary anti-hero always revolves around the tendencies of the actress playing her and whether intended awareness is either subtle or oblique.

Ellie Kendrick, who plays the title character, explains, via satellite from London, that the transition of this young woman was difficult to play but “the reason she is so popular is because she is someone that we can identify with”. She sees Anne as “spirited and funny” but that “the diary became her only friend” which she professes “is the kind of woman you run into in this girl’s soul”.

Deborah Moggach, who adapted this new miniseries, explains that it took more than two years to persuade the Anne Frank estate to allows them to pen this new perception and that “it is a testimony to the BBC that it held”. She admits that it isa complicated work to do through Anne’s eyes” because she had to give the characters life “with their own journeys”.

The Tavis Smiley Show Smiley, in headlining a show both boosted by an integrity brand and, by certain accounts, immune to ratings and late night wars, has scored many exceptional interviews over the years especially with his no nonsense style of interviewing.

Smiley begins by talking about the parallel between Afghanistan and Vietnam. Specifically, he pinpoints the idea as “a call to conscience”. He says he was talking that morning with staff about they can get at the aspect of where the money is going in this conflict. The question he begs to ask is “Are we beyond the corruption and the damage done?”.

One of the new angles he is approaching this season is a behind-the-scenes view of Secretary Of State Hilary Clinton at work. Smiley has known her for many years but he was interested in how she would approach the ideal of rivals becoming allies. He says “I whittled it down and what I learned is that it is harder than I thought”. He doesn’t understand why she wants this job at 62. There is a point in the piece he did where he believes she might get out before 4 years is done but knows, for sure, she “will not have 8”. He “cannot think of a woman who has been more demonized by the press” but “was surprised how affable she was with the press pool” that travels with her but he did make the point that he was “the only person of color”.

In terms of other people he has met and interviewed he says Fidel Castro was the most interesting in that “there is a charm to him” and that “he is extremely well read and a witness”. He explains that Castro has a “a unique and strategic type of thinking” but that “there are games he plays in conversation” which had Smiley himself “most on edge”.

Smiley also comments on the late night melee that is occurring first indicating that he doesn’t know Conan but that Jay is “a personal friend”. In terms of his opinion, he says “it was a mistake to push him out of the time slot” citing that this move “will go down as one of the biggest mistakes in the history of television” but that “it has been fascinating to watch”. Smiley indicates that “television is changing in alot of ways” but that “there is a comfort in consistency”. The problem is that “NBC ran up against something they couldn’t figure out”.

In terms of new initiatives, he and Jonathan Demme are working together on some piece in regards to the recent New Orleans & Haitian crises. Smiley has been to Haiti a number of times and says that “no country should have to endure the hell they have gone through”.

Demme says that as far as the initial footage they shot in regards to New Orleans “what we have going for us is the people” who have returned to the hard hit Ninth Ward. Demme explains that this is where Brad Pitt’s initiative was launched. The experiment in filming is being done over a 5 year period of which they are in year 2 . The parallel of Haiti he says “is on his mind right now” because of “what you discover when the structure is inadequate”. In comparison, he admits the initiative to rebuild New Orleans which was a distinct hope, did not happen. For him, it is “a humanist canvas of real life and real people” calling this project for him “a wonderful amazing challenge”. One of the most interesting aspects for him is the idea of what “big belief” and “forced faith” is. The reality as he sees it is that “it is take your medicine time but how do you circumvent that” which is the “struggle”.

NOVA: The Pluto Files This new perception and dissertation on the nature of modern astronomy and the changing view on the nature of the universe is elevated by the distinction of personalities, both dissecting and far ranging, that inhabit this new incarnation of the popular science series.

Mark Sykes, Director of the Planetary Science Institute, says the debate of Pluto as a planet or extrasolar object is “about fear”. His perception of the discussion is about points. He says Pluto “is round…it has an atmosphere…it has seasons”. The problem in the modern scientific community is that “the discoveries outstrip the vocabulary to slow them down”. He uses the analogy that the word “manufacturer” used to describe an object “made by hand” but “that definition has evolved”. With the definition of a “planet”, “it depends on what is useful” and if there is “independent importance”. He believes in the thinking “that more is not upsetting to people” but “less is” but that there should not be simply “abitrary change”.

Neil deGrasse Tyson, an astrophysicist as well as host of the show, has his own ideas in regards to this mode of thought. His vector revolves around the the fact that you want a word in regards to a universal body that classifies an object in terms of its commonality. He revels in the fact that he believes that there is still “an insatiable appetite for the cosmos” and that there are “certain aspects that tap us all”. The frustrating anglet in terms of the education for him is the idea that the solar system is taught in a certain way which is viscerally outdated. However, in persistence of this specific subject, he says “even if Pluto had been demoted, it wouldn’t have tipped the apple cart”.

The Buddha On the other end of scientific speculation, this series examines a spiritual perception enlisting the eyes of a highly placed subject who is both indicative of the teachings but also is allowing himself to be aware of the world that inhabits new ideologies but that everything remains cyclical.

David Grubin, the filmmaker behind this endeavor which is narrated by Richard Gere, describes Buddha, in his mind “as really the first psychologist” and explains that “Buddha, like Freud, was a realist” in that “he saw an experience for what it was”. The message for the film he hopes is that “it is possible for everyone to be the Buddha”.

The Venerable Metteyya Sakyaputta himself was brought into the world in the same place as the Buddha and, although he was born Hindu, he became an ordained Buddhist Monk. Metteyya relates that the key to the question of Buddha is to become a better human being. In relation to modern ideals, he believes that there is always something in the mind from cultural ideas but that one must always take a closer look. In looking at Western culture, he sees that the people are getting something unique but that they are specifically looking for the direct benefit it brings them. This was the first time he had visited the United States. He had requested from his Dharma Mother some ways to see this country. One of the first TV series he saw was “Friends”. The next was “The Simpsons”. He describes the fact that Lisa Simpson takes on all the elements of a Buddhist which is a very adept statement.

In terms of being interviewed for this film (“The Buddha”), he explains that he had no idea what it would be like but that it was important. He looks and wants to understand what Western Buddhism is missing. He sees that people are much more tense here. They want to accomplish something in a ten-day course and “get on with it”. One of the recent books he read examines human intelligence versus IQ intelligence and that we are just starting to understand these connections. Patience is essential. Metteyya relates that “Buddha gave us a path to develop human qualities of sharing, loving others, having patience and not complaining about every single thing”. “The Buddha”, he says, “sees that you are now a seed with many potentials”.

The Venerable Sakyaputta understands that, through Buddhism, people think that they will find “keys to happiness”. However, he sees that “as a Western ideal” that is mired in something “very complex” because “in order to have peace in the heart, you have to think of the mind”. He goes on to say that “Buddha says that the mind and the matter is a unique phenomena that has impact on each other”. The perception he believes is that “mental thoughts have influence where we have emotion in our mind”. He reminds through teachings that “patience is a virtue but that doesn’t mean we have to be waiting and waiting and never get any work done.” The realization has to be “Buddha is not a rock…but a human being.”

Emotions, Space & Revolution: The 2009 TCA PBS Summer Press Tour – Feature – Part II

PBS’ consistency is initiated in its relevance to the volume of life. Like the aspect of nostalgia, music also takes an exceptional approach yet the essence of the stars, both above and on Earth, draw us in.

Executive Session – Paula Kerger The President/CEO of PBS revitalized that they are pushing more towards internet and cross program pollination with shows such as “Front Line”. In terms of “American Masters”, they are working on Johnny Carson for the Fall 2010 scheduled to coincide with a new book on him. They will also be airing the Broadway version of Cyrano De Bergerac starring Kevin Kline and Jennifer Garner. PBS is also moving further in merchandising through their Discover/Hasbro connection though Kerger says that she is concerned about “the distinction between learning and advertising”.

This Emotional Life PBS is premiering “This Emotional Life” in early 2010 which includes such interviews as Richard Gere, Alanis Morissette and John Leguizamo raised around distinct themes within three two-hour programs, two of which are “negative emotions” and “happiness”. Some of the distinction are made by Dr. Daniel Gilbery who is a Harvard psychologist. He discusses that the single best progression of happiness is social contact and encourages the public discussion of therapy. He believes in shows and media that normalize the aspect of this kind of changing but admits that the film “One Flew Over The Cuckoo’s Nest” severely hurt the profession while “Good Will Hunting” and “Ordinary People” had a positive effect.

Latin Music USA The essence of the evolution of music within the Latino vision is peppered with spice and rhythm. Narrated by Jimmy Smits, the doc series, Smits believes, will be “a big revelation for the PBS American audience”. In terms of his own love for the music, he says it permeated throughout his career especially involving his move from New York to Puerto Rico. He grew up listing to Three Ocho Pansos which indicated an eclectic musical background which contributed he says to “my all inclusive angle to genres of music”. He says his mom met his dad in NY in one of the clubs playing this music doing the mambo. He says the series “reinforces how we are interconnected” citing that when they talked to Dizzy Gillespie you realize “how latin music inspires you on what jazz could be”.

Musician Bobby Sanabria then got up and started playing the bongos with aplomb running with beats and changing the essences from latin to rock to hip-hop before refracting into a simple African beat. Sanabria relates that every heavy metal guy uses a Latin beat on the heavy drums before referencing that “Satisfaction” by The Rolling Stones is based on the cha-cha-cha. Every rock club, he continues, was based on The Palladium in NYC which started with mambo. Sanabria explains in his own exceptional way that “alot of Latin music comes from the influence of Arabia since Spain was part of that empire for 800 years”. At this point Sanabria actually demonstrates how Muslim chanting can be based or integrated off the Latin beat.

Adriana Bosch, the series producer, adds that the interrelation of Latin music is all about the intersection of cultures. Emilio Estefan is of Lebanese descent, she explains. Shakira shows up at his studio and she has Lebanese descent as well but with Colombia roots. The influence of this is that, after World War I, a lot of Turks came over to Central America which allowed the ability of Latin music to blend and evolve eventually making its way to the United States.

NOVA: A Last Mission To Hubble This PBS documentary which reflects the Hubble 3D IMAX movie to be released next spring relates the intense work incumbent in repairing this massive telescope in orbit. Astronaut John Grunseld, who related his intense love of digital cameras and electronics, says that all Hubble Missions are difficult. He explains that back in 2002, the director of NASA thought the mission was too risky. However it is a story that has to be told. Grunsfeld says that initially there was a very big possibility that they might not complete the repairs on the gigantic piece adding that “sometimes you spend 12 hours in the pool and you don’t get it done”. He also explained the aspect of having the IMAX camera on the shuttle with them. He said he just flipped a switched to get it rolling inside its compartment but the mystery of how much film rolled still remains elusive. Speaking to him informally after the presentation, the question was when we will see some handheld HD footage from outside the shuttle looking past someone’s feet 100 miles below to earth. Grunsfeld relates that he is a tech head and brings his digital cameras up there with him but that all the liquid has to be removed from the gears in order to blast off in the shuttle. In that perspective, cameras (of a more personal nature) don’t seem to be taken outside the shuttle into the vacuum of space. This would be killer footage but their possibility again remains a mystery clouded under a classified wire. Space tourism will however perceive why in a few years despite Grunsfeld’s obvious enthusiasm despite his NDA.

Playing For Change This series follows the inception of music crossing boundaries in very specific ways in the essence of recording sounds to conceptualize symbiotic and natural similarities in rhythm around the globe. When filmmaker Mark Johnson first approached TV mogul/philanthropist Norman Lear with the idea, Lear said “I was creative enough to recognize a great idea and great execution”. Lear showed the aspect of the music to his friend Bono of U2 who helped bring it together. Using his Concord Music blanket which is compromised of a bunch of different labels, Lear was able to steer the project. He admits that “music is partly what my life is all about now” although he admits that “being an exec producer is how one gets names connected”. Creatively, he says, Johnson is getting the job done and he is just “fanning the embers”. The key he has found in recent years is that “music and laughter are not mutually exclusive” but that “one feeds the other”. He had the company which could help Mark and controlled a relationship with Starbucks which allowed for the music release extension. Lear continues that “the best conversations are all about questions”. This idea, he says, encourages discusssion “beyond the stained glass rhetoric you only hear on Sundays”. The music performers themselves gathered from all over the world, will tour. He sees their tonal creations as “a combination of feelings and melody” because “they have so much talent and so much soul that express a message”.

Lear, when asked to reflect on the incumbent impact of different mediums, says he wonders “if TV reflects or does it lead?” which is the same question he says can be asked of the mass media. He admits that he might never know the answer. One interrogative he states is if Obama caught a wave of a need for effectiveness across the globe as a vessel for change? The further question becomes, within his character, does Obama become that symbol?

Patti Smith: Dream Of Life (P.O.V.) This doc gives a vision of another musical intensive from a quintessential basis of American folklore which has been contained a mystery. Smith, full of smiles, says that she withdrew from the limelight in 1979 to raise her family. When her husband died in 1994, she realized she had to start a new life. She relates about when Bob Dylan asked her to tour with him which was a reflection of a conversation he had shared with Allen Ginsberg who spoke with Dylan about Smith’s faith. She admits that the film, directed by Steven Sebring, is a very accurate portrayal of her between the ages of 50 and 60 including her kids, her peers and her protests of the Bush Administration. She loves rock n’ roll but her close friends know that her favorites are Glenn Gould and Maria Callas. In terms of the subjects covered in the doc, Smith says she never told Sebring what parts of her life to focus on. He simply became part of what they did. He could have gone straight to the rock roots but she explains that “he had no design to which he gravitated towards”. In returning to her lost years, Smith explains that she and her husband moved to Detroit in 79 and lived in its heart at the Book Cadillac Hotel which was still cleaning up from the 68 riots. She loved her husband and considered him a great man. However she couldn’t walk in Detroit like she did in NY so she had to learn to be behind the wheel. She relates that she is in the middle of recording a new album which will have guests like Flea and Lenny Kaye which will be out in February 2010.

When asked about the current state of rock music, Smith relates two angles. She admits that the music “business” is in shambles despite the fact that the state of the talent is fine. However this era is not one of the rock gods. There is no Jim Morrison…Jimi Hendrix…Bob Dylan…or Grace Slick. She says that “rock n’ roll is the people’s cultural voice” which can be “revolutionary”. In terms of technology, she uses You Tube to watch Glenn Gould which is something her kids taught her. She admits to having a taste for Nirvana and My Bloody Valentine as well. In terms of her love of Maria Callas, she likes to study her as a performer in that “the way she delivers an aria” motivates “an inner narrative” that distinctifies “an emotional interpretation”. She says watching Callas build to an emotional peak is like “pissing in a river” because “you have to release at a certain time.” She admits that her voice, like Callas, “is not always perfect”. However she follows this by saying that her voice is much stronger than when it was when she was younger. She cites that Joan Baez, whom we talked to earlier, was “a real singer” with “a voice that was flexible with perfect pitch” while she herself was more a performer. She says that her time in the 60s was “more like a bridge between traditional music in the most revolutionary sense and the punk movement”. Her clan wanted to “remind people of the innate power of it all” and that “it belonged to the people”. She admits that they lost some of the great artists in the 70s and that they thought that “celebrity and drugs would engulf it all”. They wanted “to break through it”. She also says she always thought “they” were like Moses. They could see the ground but relishes that the “next wave of kids made it”. The one progression she admits to being proud of is that she is as loud as some of the major guitar players. She also addresses her relationship with Robert Mapplethorpe saying that their relationship as artist and muse was “based on trust…never thought”.

In terms of her sacrifice leaving the public eye, she says that “I am ‘Mom’ first”. She set aside time each day when she retreated from public life to write poetry and songs with her husband but states that she was never bored. She liked to study with a creative impulse saying “it was a nice life”. When she examined her vision of music, she saw some structure through John Coltrane and Roland Kirk’s music. She likes the “idea of improvising and having a base root” but “talking to the stratosphere” while “returning to your root consciousness”. In continuing with an almost psychological base, Smith relates that, in her childhood, her mother was a waitress and her father was a factory worker. She says that they didn’t have alot but they were well loved. Her sense of rebellion in later life had nothing to do with her parents at all. She felt confined by the government, not by her home life. The questions were spiritual but reflected more culturally. They lived in South New Jersey where there was no cultural base. She just felt the need to break out of it,

As Patti sings “The Blackian Years” in essence of her husband followed by “One Common Wire”, the reflection of hope and a wisp of Dylan reflect in the fading of the afternoon.

First Look: BROOKLYN’S FINEST – Overture

Overture Films just provided IR with this new still from director Antoine Fuqua’s new film “Brooklyn’s Finest” starring Richard Gere and Ethan Hawke along with Wesley Snipes and Don Cheadle pictured above. The film releases March 5, 2010.