Natural Legacy & Prevalent Viewpoints: Returning Television – Fall 2011 – Part II

The nature of legacy shows resounds in their ability to highlight and enhance without losing what they were in earlier incarnations. “Two & A Half Men” has been the most prevalent viewpoint in the last year with the departure of Charlie Sheen and eventual replacement by Ashton Kutcher but approaching characters like Batman and the vastness of the Star Wars universe holds its perils as well.

Batman: Brave & The Bold Interacting with the lore and mythology of other characters within the guise of Batman allows the creators to show and gauge the interest of fans (or the writers themselves) of how interesting certain backstories run. Highlighting lesser known vintage characters like The Atom or exploring the essence of sequel prowess with Green Lantern’s handling of Star Sapphire shows the possibility of them  against those backdrops without having to worry about logic. However, something like traveling through time to save different incarnations of Batman so he can exist in the current timeline is straining belief but the creative team knows that this is a chance to go off the rails before the next series inevitably return to darkness.

The Clone Wars Making the mythology more vast and intrinsic without overcoming the basic nature of the universe it has a created is a daunting task especially when you are writing the backstories of several of the species in later films. What this show tends to do, in short order, with adequate results, is create a depth of structure where the features just laid the ground work. Two story progressions this season so far show this both with the “Water War” progression with the Gungans and the Mon Calamari which dictate certain emotional responses in terms of war structure. By contrast, the episodes with General Krell where he displays a lack of empathy and regard to the clones results in a mutiny of sorts that creates a microcosm of battle command in its simplest form wrestling the idea away from being purely Jedi=centric.

The Big Bang Theory The indiosyncrasies of the core bunch continue to grow but what Chuck Lorre has learned to do is spin moons within the planetary configuration of the core five specifically with Howard’s fiance and Amy, Sheldon’s would-be girlfriend. The show has always been about social inadequacy and how technology and simple awkwardness make the possibility of these people connecting even more so. By changing the dynamic, especially with Penny, the idea becomes more of a wingman persona with all these people moving out in different directions on their own while still remaining a core group with varying circumstances and results.

Two & A Half Men In resurrecting the show after the unfortunate inevitable departure of Charlie Sheen, one would have thought it would be disastrous without him. The way however the writers have maintained shows a distinct undeniable truth that the writing, if done in a very specific way without negating or denying Sheen’s influence and still having a snarky but not mean edge towards its former star, shows an effective overhaul. You realize how key the bumbling mannerisms of Jon Cryer truly anchor the show and magnifies the everyman quality of it. Ashton Kutcher’s character is not a Charlie Harper but takes on a more cool quality from creator Chuck Lorre’s other show “The Big Bang Theory” in that certain qualities can be good and bad. An especially good two episode arch involves Alan (Cryer) and his worst day as well as a psychotic break where he reverts and tries to emulate his brother. It is neat because it addresses the good and bad sides of Charlie Harper while showing empathy. It might not be the Charlie show anymore but it does show that it can survive with dignity and darkness without him.

Prevalent Riffing & Inner Focus: Returning Television – Fall 2011 – Part I

Animation and improvisation doesn’t always go hand-in-hand much like live action riffing but this first batch of returning shows highlights the ability to work both sides of the line. “South Park” is the most prevalent of these with the ability to turn headlines within the week though its dramatic subtlety is becoming more defined as time goes on while “Archer” while smaller in its amount of episodes is becoming more highly ironic. “Community” is moving into left field with some great elements of spontaneity but needs to find its inner focus while “Fringe” has purely reinvented itself while keeping everything that has made it an exceptional show.

Archer Coming back with an abridged mini-season in a three-episode arch entitled “Heart Of Archness”, our oft-maligned and inspid hero has vanished for a couple months after the death of his Russian fiance. We find him on an island screwing newly honeymooned women until Rip (played with Peppard accuracy by Patrick Warburton) comes at the request of his mother to take him back. Archer makes the seaplane crash and they are capture by pirates. Archer ends up killing alot of them on an ambush back to their fortress island and he becomes “Pirate King”. The progression of that is what we come to expect from Archer: ideas that might work in a feature film but perverted to a point as to make it totally ludicrous.

South Park The continuing intensity of off-shot humor especially where Cartman is concerned knows no bounds except when it takes a toll on his mental health. Whereas Kenny will always be the poor kid, Cartman is coming face to face with his own mortality on more than one occasion. While Kyle is dealing with a more homeward-bound problem, Cartman is having to deal with more deep seated personality issues. While this element of poverty, reliance issues and “Assburgers” are all done in jest, the intermittent darkness seeping through the cracks is making the show all the more dexterous in its ability to tackle pretty exceptional drama under the guise of comedy.

Fringe Perceiving the idea of life without Peter Bishop does alot to reset the stakes of what is possible in the universe, even parallel ones. In creating this new paradox, the series has done something undeniably clever: reset the clock in terms of mythology as well as romantic and dramatic tension. The alternate universe creation might be resolved but the problems within the personal structure in terms of Walter and Olivia are not because they don’t understand or embrace what Peter is. Meanwhile new alliances are formed and Fringe level events still go on without the worry of disbelief. Peter Bishop is the man out of sync with the world and yet he is the only one who knows what is going on. Succinct storytelling is exampled but with an innate sense of keeping the audience on edge.

 

Community The team seems to innately run more in the stratosphere but not with the same creativity they have showed in the past couple years though the moments of levity still come quick and unabated. It is almost as if they know how far they can go so the line isn’t as much of a taboo thing anymore. Consequently the stories tend to lean more towards morality tales which the participants perceive as “dark” though the climactic paintball episode last year stretched the limits. The series has undeniably set characters now that the audience can run with but without a structured base of where they need to go, their lives may or may not be complete.

Underlying Ideas & Conceptual Reintegration: Returning Television – Summer 2011

Human fallacy and the thematic machinations of animation rarely move hand-in-hand except in the process sometimes of summer. Affecting a change in structure especially within drama and comedy is tricky, especially if one is not sure about the outcome. Staying with the norm only can work so far before the entire concept has to be thrown on its head, not in terms of tone but in the breaking point of the characters and what they consider as normal.

Penguins Of Madagascar The leftovers continue with their intensive functionality despite a bit of overactive silliness. The episodes are not as much spy-oriented as they are situational with the exception of the mythology-based Uncle Nigel episode though that ends with the emasculation of Private. The best revolves around Rico when the other three compadres end up stricken by herring food poisoning. The pacing becomes more reminiscent of a “Tom & Jerry” cartoon while an episode with King Julian being moved to the petting zoo for a bit is nothing if not funny as the lemur provides the inherent balance of the show which still has a fresh functionality.

Burn Notice Heading into the summer, just as Michael Weston was about to insure himself within the FBI, his handler in Max turns up dead. In between maintaining different possibilities for his friends and dealing with everything from militia to Serbian smugglers, the trails keep leading in and out from who he thinks actually is trying to subvert his reintegration into the CIA despite the fact that the “company”, especially his new contact Agent Pearce, thinks his crew is a detriment to him. The notion of reveal, especially in Michael’s misguided focus and perception, threatens to undo everything this burnt spy has worked towards. While last season seems to indicate a lack of vindication on the burn notice, its possibility and the double-cross element here rises the story structure back to its necessary level to keep the series both critical and entertaining.

Futurama Finding new and interesting ways to interact the space-time continuum is timeless for these characters. Ever since returning, they have 10 years of odd technology and pop culture to catch up on. Unlike something like “The SImpsons” plus with the allure of basic cable, the series can go as far as it wants to but smartly keeps in touch with its core audience of smart but still dumb. The aspect of the Fry/Leela relationship is placed in a contextual space which allows it to grow but, as usual and to great avail, whether it be increasing his processing power to become godlike to cloning himself and drinking all the alcohol on Earth, Bender is still the man, or clunker (as he would enjoy).

In Plain Sight In approaching a life such as those of Marshalls, especially one as cantankerous as Mary, going from 0 to 100 might be a way of life. However in dealing with Mary McCormack’s real life pregnancy, the writers were thrown a curveball. Granted it gives more humor and a distinct push out to the female audience members but it also creates an interesting dichotomy which permeates through different episodes. Someone like Mary would look at all the options but she seems to just let it go like she did the moment of passion she had with the would-be father. While this might be explained later, it creates a paradox of character which in general changes the complete direction of the show. Whether it is for good or bad is simply in reflection more so of the ratings but from a character point of view, its possibility limits the options available.

Finality, Character & Texture: The ABC Winter 2010 TCA Press Tour – Feature

ABC has show an ability for a specific cross-section of shows that push the envelope. While some like “Pushing Daisies” and “Better Off Ted” sometimes start to fall along the wayside, other successes like “Castle”, “Cougar Town” and “Modern Family” show that by angling the formula to a not-set portrayal, one can reap great awards. However with “Flash Forward” not performing as high as thought, the behemoth of “Lost” accelerates into its final season.

Lost The influx of many of the cast members for the final season were met with a thundering round of applause for this show who, in many ways, captured the zeitgeist the way few other shows in the past couple years have been able to do.

Emile de Ravin, who plays the returning Claire who had been missing since we saw her in Jacob’s hut a few seasons back, mentioned that they have seven more episodes to film in Hawaii. Her fondest moments have been when the whole cast has been together because of its family connotations though when she read the pilot back in the beginning, it took 3 times before it made any sense.

Evangeline Lilly, who was picked out of obscurity to play Kate, admits that as she was coming out for these final interviews, she knew she was going to “cry like a baby when it ends”. One of the aspects people don’t know is how hard filming the show can be. For her, the most lingering moments that stay in her mind come from the first season especially in the scenes when Claire gave birth and Boone died. That specific episode for her “culminated everything we were talking about”. The most intrinsic point for her was trying to find Kate as a character. Also being on Hawaii shooting can be a double-edged sword (in her estimation). She says “living in paradise is a little bit of a prison” because “when we’re on the island, we are on the island” but there is “an innate sense of freedom now that we are anticipating the end”.

Daniel Dae Kim, whose character Jin, morphed from a non-English speaking character to utterly subtle feats of discourse, says that the moment for him that defined the show was when they were launching the raft in the first season because that provided a culmination of thought. Now with the 6th season, the narrative style is again changing somewhat which distinctly makes it all the more challenging.

Josh Holloway, who created one of the most nuanced con-men in TV history, with the nickname-spewing Sawyer, says the whole experience has been incredible but there has been something about this last year. He admits a certain propensity for group scenes. He says they take two or three days to film but if you position yourself right, that is key, and admits he has gotten very good at that. For him, the premiere this year felt big like a finale which points for an interesting end to come. He thinks back to when he read the original pilot. His first impression was that Sawyer “was an asshole” and that he, as an actor” had “to figure out how to stay alive” because “unless [Sawyer] became something different, he might die soon”. He parallels the aspect of Kate explaining “as Evy says, to play a character within a place, you have to explore new character perspectives”. Josh’s observation of this man becomes that “Sawyer has been walking the fine line of humanity but retaining his edge”. This comes on the aspect of the writers putting him through every possible situation, both emotionally and physically. The scariest thing of all was “the whole Juliet thing”. He thought the audience might reject those two characters getting together because it was “discovering his humanity while being salty”. He admits that many of the greatest points of his life happened during the show: “validation as an actor, marrying, having a baby, my first home”.

Michael Emerson, who emerged in later seasons as a major character in Benjamin Linus, says that, with a show like “Lost”, it is better to be in the dark adding that “it is nice not to be burdened with the secret” because “that seems to get in the way”. In terms of the moments he remembers most, he jokes “that I have alot of fond memories of breathless confrontations in small rooms”. He says the Whidmore Bedroom and Jacob scenes are “scary and I love them”. He also mentions a scene when he and Sawyer are on a cliff and trading Steinbeck quotes all the while with Ben saying “I have a rabbit in my backpack”. In terms of the ending of season five, he thought it to be a master move adding “that it was a two-part cliffhanger but sufficiently mind-bending”. He ultimately sees Ben “as a character that reacts in a calculated way but once in while acts in a childishly impulsive way”.

Terry O’Quinn, who undertakes the enigma of Locke, says that he found out that he wasn’t real Locke during last season about a month before the episode aired, indicating that he was completely unaware to the fact for most of last season. For him, there is no true special moment in the series though he remembers when they were hanging out between a break in filming listening to Naveen Andrews playing guitar under the famous Banyan tree. He also reflects back to the pilot with JJ telling him that at first in the beginning with Locke there wouldn’t be alot but later on there would be.

Damon Lindelof, who along with fellow executive producer Carlton Cuse, have become the think tank of “Lost” after the departure of co-creator JJ Abrams, says that the idea of ending with the 6th season is “doing it while we still care” calling “Lost” “a once-in-a-career experience”. ABC allowing them to end the series on these specific terms is what Damon terms “a tremendous gift”. He echoes Evangeline in that they can’t believe it is coming to an end. In terms of what they tell the actors in terms of the story, he jokes that “quite honestly, we don’t speak to them at all”. He uses the example that if they told Terry O’Quinn (who plays Locke) that he was actually playing a guy from 1000 years ago, it would completely alter the approach. For Lindelof, the most memorable points in the show are the bridging aspects in creating these connections. For the following seasons, they usually start writing in the summer time but the inherent challenge always was walking the bridge, even when time travel came into play. In terms of the finale, he says with a wry smile: “Get ready to scratch your heads America”.

Lindelof says the major shift since the show started is informational because of the minutae that the fans follow vigorously. The biggest obstacle is to “guarantee a shitty ending” to “Lost”. For him, “the worst ending we could provide is a safe ending” but “you can’t take a risk just to take a risk” because ultimately in respect they “have no excuse to say anything other than ‘this is the way we wanted it to end'”. He admits that there is hope on their parts to wow the audience with the finite possibilities of the finale because “it wouldn’t be ‘Lost’ if it wasn’t an ongoing or active debate”. In terms of story for the final season, “there is an inherent process that when ending something, you always think about the beginning. He reflects on an earlier comment by Josh about the essence of new character perspectives because “you want to show the audience the before of where the characters were then”. He says he does reflect on what the legacy of the show will be but realizes that in the weeks after the series finale airs, the only thing people will be thinking about is just that episode. He makes a comparison to “The Sopranos” because people remember absolutely everything about the diner scene and the fade to black. The end always moves in mysterious ways.

Carlton Cuse, who runs the show with Damon, says that “we came up with the final image of the show in the first season but we started to add elements to that as we went along towards the end point”. The character stuff, he adds, works itself out as you go along but that the process of ending the show was fun because, as in many seasons before, the actors didn’t know where it was going beyond the next given script. The network has not pressured them for a spin-off but definitely says that “we are ending this story”. As far as the moment he remembers most, it involved Jack swimming out with the dog to save the drowning girl. In terms of the new season, the premiere picks up exactly where the finale last season left off. He agrees that they have been very circumspect about what actually might be going on in the 6th season. Jack and Farraday, he says, believe that the bomb going off might reset everything. He warns that not every question will be answered because they still want to maintain a fundamental sense of mystery.

Executive Briefing: Stephen McPherson The enigmatic and charming head of ABC entertainment actually made a point of introducing the “Lost” cast stating that many of the crew and some of the cast were still in Hawaii shooting but that “we look forward to finishing the journey”.

He recollects that when they were shooting the pilot for “Lost”, “with Evangeline, it came down to 24 hours before” when they barely got her work visa cleared from Canada. He credits Abrams and Lindelof for having a plan and a mythology in what “arguably will be one of the most influential shows of the decade”. He compares the season premiere “to nothing different than a gigantic movie” adding that “they put all they spend on the screen”.

In terms of ABC’s fall, McPherson announced the picks up of “Cougar Town”, “Modern Family” and “The Middle” for next season. No decisions, he says, have been made yet on “Hank” or “Better Off Ted” while “Castle” is their highest performing repeat show saying that, with the Alyssa Milano episode, the show “has met its stride” adding that he “hears so much anecdotally about that show”. To that point, he says that many “shows are alchemy to some extent”. With “Modern Family”, the pitch was simply “a big family”.

In terms of two new and expensive shows finding their footing, McPherson says, first off, with “V”, they always intended it to be in chapters but that production issues came into play. With “Flash Forward”, he said, it was a bit different because the repeat viewers didn’t seem to be coming back. The show’s reaction has to be supportive of its production. That is why they did a big push about bring “Flash Forward” back while making “V” more independent of that conversation. He sees a similar possibility in the upcoming “Happy Town” because it is also “serialized and event” but “honestly it all comes down to how it performs in the end” adding that they don’t have a set premiere date as of yet.

In terms of the response on the ongoing NBC difficulties, he says that “seeing a great network tumble is not something we revel in” because “it is disconcerting to see that happening in the industry”. That said, McPherson states that they are actually up 8% in their 10pm slots because the inherent situation has put “an emphasis on creative shows” adding that “we are very happy with the way things have gone down.”

The Deep End One of the few new shows that ABC is bringing forth is this lawyer drama which uses the rookie perception to show this cutthroat world in a new era.

Exec Producer David Hemingson, whose experience in the legal world provided the basis for the series, calls it “a confluence of circumstances” since “the show mirrors the beginning of my career. Billy Zane, as the venemous Cliff Huddle, calls his character “a shark” with a personality “always moving…always calculating”. He sees Cliff as operating on his own code because even though he and his wife are very passionate, he can’t keep his hands off of everybody else so he is interested how they handle his infidelity.

Clancy Brown, an actor best known for his genre turns in “Highlander” and “Starship Troopers” and recently mentioned as a front runner for the movie adaptation of “Lobo”, sees the story as a reflection of present day mediaries in that “you just look at the headlines and see the struggles between the letter of the law and the spirit of the law”. Matt Long, embodying series lead Dylan Hewitt who must deal with attacks on all sides, used lawyers in his family as reference but understood the key to the character is “to add to the situation but not add to what the hell is going on” but “it also helps to know what you’re [actually] saying.

Buddies, Lives & Bauer: The Fox Winter 2010 TCA Press Tour – Feature

Fox, in past seasons, has tried a cross-section of different inferences melding between both genre outlays like “Dollhouse” and “Fringe” while trying out new essences like “Glee” while stalwarts like “American Idol” rumble along. The essence has always been about crucial character work with an overall sense of commercial viability.

Code 58 This new buddy series from “Burn Notice” creator Matt Nix places Bradley Whitford from “The West Wing” and “Sunset 60” with Colin Hanks as two reverse sector cops who investigate odd little crimes, not unlike “Dragnet” with role reversal which his father made a film of many years ago.

Nix explains that he wrote the original feature script that did not sell about 12 years ago. Two or three years ago, Mikkel (Matt’s manager) brought it back up. “Code 58”, he expounds, is the actual Dallas police code for a routine investigation. The key becomes, paraphrasing Travis Bickle, “getting organized” admitting all of his television heroes, including Michael Weston on “Burn”, do it. He jokes that Shawn Ryan, who runs “Lie To Me” is giving him some coaching lessons since to maintain the balance between the humor and drama is difficult to do well but “sometimes you get a break”. He calls the cops in this new show “not necessarily bad cops”. Dan, played by Whitford, “is a fantastic 1981 cop and everything that comes along with that” adding that “he hasn’t really moved along with the times”. Jack, played by Hanks, is what Nix describes as “a very good cop who has embarassed his bosses publicly”. The irony, he says, is that they are not really investigating the crimes they solve. The key becomes finding “three or four stories that work and dovetailing them into each other”. Nix admits that now, after having some experience in this genre, he has become more comfortable with the angle of some of his characters adding that “it’s not like a sit down and think ‘I am going to make them laugh with this one'”. He explains that the production model of “Code 58” is very similar to “Burn Notice” in Miami with Dallas providing the balance of both incentives and crews.

Whitford, in trademark style, with a new mustache to boot, jumps into the fray saying “it turned out the last pilot I did was not picked up”. The original script, called “Jack & Dan” was more angled on a lecherous cop. Whitford personally sees his character as a great cop adding that “we turn out to be wonderful crime solvers” but continually joking that “there is a little bit of a drinking issue”. There was a tone within this series that he says he really responded to it which is similar to “Burn Notice”. He says when he first watched that other show, he saw an Elmore Leonard/”Raising Arizona” action comedy flavor which he had not seen on TV. He doesn’t know if people will be “fascinated or disgusted by my character” adding that “30 years ago I could have been a hot young cop” but that “I wear make up for a living” explaining that “there is no way to win”. He continues that he went “from feeling like a young actor to [feeling like] Ernest Borgnine”. He explains that what he shares with this character is that “I have a bright future behind me” which results in “a ripe combination of wisdom”.

Colin Hanks, for his point just looks on in disbelief as Whitford goes at a million miles a minute exhorting a chuckle saying that “for me, this is a script where I actually get to say funny stuff back” from “wanting to be able to have a witty banter”.

Executive Session: Peter Chernin & Kevin Reilly Fox has been finding their stride with the genres but the necessities involve staying one step ahead of the competition.

Chernin begins by saying that “Glee” would be picked up for a second season and that they would be adding three new characters but that these new cast members would not be determined by vote. In terms of the Conan situation, he says there is not much more to digest although he made a point that their position on late night was consistent. He professes his love for Conan but says that the late night host needs to make a decision about his own future. He does admit that they have talked to his people and there have been informal conversations. Jumping from there becomes the ensuing questions about “American Idol”. Chernin agrees that Simon Cowell is irreplacable but that “AI” needs to continue despite any of these perceptions. His outlook is that there are very fundamental differences between “X Factor” and “Idol” but the true fact is that “Simon is at the end of his contract”.

Reilly, for his part, relays some statistics beginning with the facts that they were up 14% (7% if you strip out the sport package). He says that “The Cleveland Show” was “a great step”. He also speaks of “Bob’s Burger” which is to be a multi-part reality series based within “Glee”. The Simon speculation continues to build which will be addressed but reinforces that there is “a lot of anticipation for Ellen”.”Human Target” will be premiering out of “24”. He speaks to the 13 episode order of “Dollhouse” saying that they had to “work to do it on Friday”. He called it ” a good show that had its run…and that’s that”.

At this point, Simon Cowell himself emerges based on the different ideas that Reilly and Chernin had been bouncing around for the previous minutes. Cowell says that “there has been alot of speculation[on his future] partly because we didn’t have an agreement” before saying that they had reached “a deal at half past eleven” the night prior with the lock to launch “X-Factor” in the US in 2011. “This will be my last season on American Idol” were his following words. He explained that he had met Chernin last October but that he had made a committment to staying on the show (“Idol”) in America. Cowell’s strategic belief revolves around “having a plan like a good football team. Even though Idol is not his show, Cowell is very close to it and is “confident that it will continue to be the number one show”. The angle he likes with “X Factor” is that there is no upper age limit and because of the development time frame, “we have some time to figure out who the judging panel is” since “the auditions are done in quite different ways”. He makes the joke that Ryan [Seacrest] should be a judge “because it will be another job”. He makes the point that he “has had the best 9 years of my life doing the job” on “Idol”. The most important thing in a judge, he says, is someone who knows what they are talking about who can shepherd the most important idea overall which is finding talent. His intention is to leave “Idol” “bigger and better this year than I have before”. While admitting he doesn’t like rules, he says that the example of Susan Boyle is the best ideal of his thought process because “the contestants are what makes [these shows] different”. In terms of “X-Factor” he said “America needs a second show…a different type a show”. And with that, in front of us, he signs the “X-Factor” deal memo as Reilly and Chernin look on.

Past Life This new series from one of minds behind “Friday Night Lights” follows an investigative team that uses structures of past regression in homicide victims to rebuild and solve cases. While the pursuant of forensic-based cases makes this a hybrid with a bit of supernatural, the necessity will need to be of balance to maintain the viewer.

Exec producer David Hudgins understands that “one of the challenges of a show like this is belief”. He said one of the aspects that they talked about ruminated on the platform of “no rules” which he interprets as “pushing the envelope”. In this way “we took the attitude that it is ‘all’ for real”. It was a matter of keeping an open mind as to how they approach the material and reflecting back that “anything is possible”. The key was also to keep the stories contemporary which was a balance of both a limited budget but also the structure of shooting in Atlanta which, beyond its incentives, didn’t offer the option of an ocean or desert

Lou Pitt, also an executive producer who also made the film “Hollywood Homicide” with Harrison Ford, says that with “Past Life” what “we try to do is take a little bit of the reality and give it a twist”. The series itself is based on the book “The Reincarnationist” by M.J. Rose who also wrote some of the series episodes. Pitt believes that the fact that more than a million people in the world believe in reincarnation is a good start.

Richard Schiff, who plays Dr. Malachi Talmadge on the show, says “I actually believe in it…so there”. He likes that there is something generally good about these characters in that they are healers. The aspect of reincarnation relies on the fact that “certain phenomenon cannot be explained in another way”. The reason these investigators return to this certain field is because these are “unsolvable mysteries”. He admits that there is alot of things in life that he doesn’t understand but that the show “explores some of the mysteries that confound me”.

Kelly Giddish who plays regressionist Dr. Kate McGinn, says that “the relationships in these worlds are defined” so there needs to be a search for a “special reason”. Nicolas Bishop, who plays her more unbelieving partner Price Whatley, says that doing the show motivates him with alot more curiousity adding that “to delve into skepticism is an interesting concept”.

Ravi Patel, who rounds out the cast as Dr. Rishi Karna, admits that he doesn’t believe in reincarnation but that he does believe in karma which is “more of a principle”. One of thee major elements he enjoys about the show is that “no overarching key is left unturned” which allowed for some “really pleasantly surprising things to come to light”.

24 This series has becomes a crucial part in pacing. Like John McClane was to “Die Hard”, Jack Bauer now has a complete rule ovr a certain part of the TV landscape. The question becomes one of thought, pliability and effectiveness in the coming season.

Exec Producer Howard Gordon, who was also a major force on “The X-Files”, says that there is a cathartic aspect to “24” but balanced within that has always been a “creative proposition”. The key becomes to not become “too comfortable in your assumptions” but adds that “there is no sea change or conscious propaganda”.

Kiefer Sutherland, who also acts a producer on the show in addition to his starring role, says that their objective is “great substance in a 24-hour period”. He points to that fact that “24” as a show alleviated alot of the stress people had about terrorism on an individual level after 9/11. What Howard [Gordon] did was give Jack something to “right” for. He agrees that they have taken Jack to “some dark places: the loss of his wife, the estrangement of his daughter”. The kicker, for him. “is that giving him something to fight for is an exciting place to be for a character”. He relays that it surprises him that the show has been translated into 14 languages and that Jack Bauer has become part of the idiom of pop culture. He actually relates a story some kids told him about horsing around in a hot tub including a cannonball scenario where they said “I’m going to Jack Bauer you”. In terms of creative decisions that pushed the boundaries politically, Kiefer says that the torture sequence which were done for dramatic purpose did cause them some heat. However his perception is that Bauer is a “result oriented character” when, by paradox, his superiors wanted to do it by the book but admitted “that was the only time we addressed a specific political issue”. He always is shocked though when people say they feel safer on the plane with him.

Katee Sackoff, formerly of Battlestar Galactica and the short lived “Bionic Women” joins the cast as Dana who is involved in the new narrative this season. She says that this character is the closest she has ever played to herself even though Dana is a computer analyst. In this kind of situation, everything becomes more interesting because the woman has a past. One of the character’s former strengths was raising show ponies in Kentucky. But, of course, as Sackoff states, “it goes bad…it’s 24”. She admits Dana is “very good and loves being close to Chloe’s boss” a subtle hint at a development possibly this season. Her strength, she jokingly, adds is that she “has boobs and two guns” because unlike “Battlestar” “this is different…this is on land”.

Bosses, Medics & Comedy: The CBS Winter 2010 TCA Press Tour – Feature

Heading into the New Year, the essential motion of what has happened in terms of business over the past couple months reflects within television as a whole highlighting the keys in all. CBS continues as one of the more stable permutations on the network landscape.

Executive Session – Nina Tassler With the angle in the last couple days ensconced in the talk of Jay Leno possibly moving back to 11:30pm pushing Conan later, CBS, as evidenced by Craig Ferguson’s confident belying of the situation, seems stable on all fronts. Tassler says that the entire progression of the Leno debacle has proved that “10 o’clock is a great business for us” and that “we have a stable strategy” adding that “our business is thriving” and that “Leno was an experiment that did not work”. Another big entrance within the structure was Charlie Sheen’s arrest for domestic battery in Aspen over the holidays. Tassler responded in kind saying “we are very sensitive to the fact that this is a personal and private matter” but added that “Two & A Half Men” is “on its regular production schedule” keying in “that we taped a show last night”. “American Idol” despite the departure of Paula Abdul is still considered the “death star” even though they agreed to place “NCIS” up against it. Tassler highlights that, in the fall, they had more content than they had real estate for stating that they still have 18 episodes in the hopper for “Flashpoint” as well as 13 of Canadian series “The Bridge”. Despite CBS’ recent success, Tassler says that they are still “in an experimental phase” but says that “the numbers and reach have certainly put us in a good position”. She went on to admit that “Three Rivers” was officially cancelled saying that “we know enough that when we say ‘haitus’, it is code for something else”. In terms of blossoming daytime shows, she announces that “Let’s Make A Deal” with Wayne Brady is doing well, and comparatively better, she admits, than “Guiding Light”. It is making them look at daytime again as a whole different thing since “The Price Is Right” is getting all times highs with Drew Carey at the helm. When asked about the longevity of “CSI” since Laurence Fishburne came onboard, she only offers that he “is a powerful actor and a force to be reckoned with” and “as he is more comfortable with the team as his character, the more they are comfortable with him”. On another logical front, she stated that “Numbers” is still being considered for next year but that they had to make room for “Miami Medical”.

Comedy Showrunners Bidding reverence to the team which re-energized the three-camera studio sitcom in the form of “Two & A Half Men” and the breakout hit “The Big Bang Theory”, Chuck Lorre and his co-exec producer Bill Prady seems to get the way it works but even admit that everything is not always at effortless as it seems. In reference to “The Big Bang Theory”, Lorre says that the science has to be almost irrelevant but the key is trying to make the material work without completely understanding its basis of a technical level. He says the most fun is when they sit in the writers’ room and talk about physics because they fail on a regular basis. He says they might write about scientists but they are not scientific. It is purely a self-defense mechanism. He admits that everyone got choked up during the Penny/Sheldon Christmas scenes. Sheldon, as a character, is so alienated but once in a while something happens with him. In Lorre’s mind, Sheldon and Penny have become “so natural” on the show. For him, this translates into growing the characters without making them redundant. One of the ways, he says, they do that is by showing where Leonard and Sheldon come from in meeting their mothers. “What happened to us when we were put at 9:30pm was very interesting”, he says. He was first able to learn on the job when he did “Roseanne” and has been able to stick around for long enough to put it to good use. Returning to character, Lorre says that the fact that the other characters stay around Sheldon indicate that they love what he does. One of the things with Sheldon is that he decided not to play the sexual game. He is only interested in science and what George Lucas does. The reality is that you can’t run awry on a show where the ensemble is so strong. Sheldon, for example, as a character knows what is going on around him but chooses not to partake yet he is so passionate about what he does do.

Bill Prady follows up Chuck’s comments saying that one of the things with “Big Bang” from the beginning that they wanted to do was when the characters talked about their work, they wanted to keep it real. They do try to stay current with some stuff but the nerd references are all done in the writers’ room themselves. The questions abound. Where is Sheldon in the family of man? Would Sheldon take a person to the hospital? Absolutely! He would engage the Hero Paradigm (because he saw it in video games). For Prady, from a writing point of view, the story of Sheldon is very cool and fun to write to but so is the idea of Wallowitz having his first girlfriend. He says, in general, they have heard alot of thoughts from a whole spectrum of people in regards to the show. All of the characters, he thinks, have connected because they are on the outside looking in. He likens it to being on the other train in “Stardust Memories” in the analogy that “we are over here writing code but people over there are drinking great things”.

Undercover Boss This new reality show, premiering after the Super Bowl, has the heads of companies coming in and getting their hands dirty. In all actuality, it comes off more as a publicity stunt than a real “in-your-face” show. Exec Producer Stephan Lambert says that the reason that they pursued this idea is that there are so many shows set in the workplace but not the “real” workplace. He says that anybody who has had a boss in a company will understand the show. “Undercover Boss”, he highlights, is not mean spirited but it does place a person like a CEO in a situation that he can’t see back at headquarters. The challenge is coming up with compelling ways to show it. The CEO they used with Waste Management: Larry O’Donnell was going out on work routes before they even started the show. The question for him was how do you streamline the corporation and face reality.Every employee wants to show up and do a good job but they also want to have a voice. Some of their other upcoming bosses that they are featuring on the front lines include 7-11, Hooters and White Castle. Presenting a boss who doesn’t know what it is like on the front lines is a good principle. He says that they are particularly keen on focusing on front facing companies. The reason they started with Waste Management was that it was specifically residential.

O’Donnell, for his part as one of the CEOs being shown, says that one of the main reasons he did the show was to find out what some of the issues were out on the field. He found there was a time clock issue at one of the facilities which is one of the policies he had put in place which had caused problems. He says that for years he was trying to figure out how to improve their safety carriers and to be more positive. The reality he says us that the boss in this scenario has to be willing to show the faults of the company.

Miami Medical This new outlay from producer Jerry Bruckheimer takes the field of EMT medicine and places it in a tropical setting. Jeffrey Leiber, one of the exec producers, says that one of the show’s key themes is “it can happen to you”. Even though the show is set in Miami, a majority is show in shot in LA yet the cornerstone is based around Ryer Medical in South Florida. This center is one of only 3 trauma centers of its kind. Bruckheimer, when asked about his effect on television in terms of his ability to create a genre unto himself, said that it is hard to give an answer on the brand. He says their perception has never really changed. It is about the writing and finding the right actors to play these three-dimensional characters. He sees this series as another way of looking at a medical show by using a standard more of gallow humor.

Jeremy Northam, who plays the lead Dr. Matthew Proctor , says that the niceties between different kinds of network shows is sometimes lost on him because he likes to come “as present and loose as possible” though he does admit there is alot of “proppage and gurneys” in this particular show Steve Maeda, another one of the execs on the program, sums up this specific trauma unit which deals with only the first 60 minutes of a problem by saying it allows for both pacing acceleration but also a sense of foreboding.